Tag Archives: controversial

Carlton Draught’s new TVC campaign

Your Weenis, your Weenis, it's wrinkly and it's pink

Your Weenis, your Weenis, it's wrinkly and it's pink

Here is the latest campaign for Carlton Draught, the sixth in the ‘Made from Beer’ series.

It was due to launch on television in February but was pulled by Carlton & United Breweries at the last-minute due to concerns that it may offend viewers.

The full series of 7 short spots can be seen at http://anyexcuse.com.au/ and is worth checking out, especially for Tingle, Weenis, and Wart.

The ads are pretty funny, and continue the humourous themes seen earlier in the series. I do hope, however, that the late jitters isn’t indicative of an increasing trend of advertisers becoming frightened enough about offending people that they substantially alter their marketing campaigns.

Updated: This campaign has now been pulled from the internet as well due to fears over a ‘public backlash’.

Youtube ad campaign for Danish Tourism board depicts single mum looking for her child’s father

I have only just discovered this extraordinary ad campaign on Boing Boing – there was some controversy surrounding this back in September resulting in the ad being removed from Youtube.

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What makes this campaign extraordinary is the fact that rather than promoting safe sex, or prevention of STDs or unwanted pregnancy, it is in fact for the Danish Tourist Board, and the objective is to encourage more overseas visitors to consider Denmark as a holiday destination.

The controversial aspects of the campaign are clear, and have been discussed elsewhere, particularly on Adland.tv.

What struck me was the comments made by the CEO of Danish Tourism, Dorte Kiilerich.

“Karen’s story shows that Denmark is a free place with space for you to be who you want. The film is good exposure for Danish self-sufficient and dignified women.”

I don’t really see this at all, and judging by the controversy and subsequent apology, it would seem that other people don’t either. I am just wondering if this is because we aren’t Danish. Denmark is a society that really is socially ahead of the curve, having been the first country to legalise pornography (in 1969) and same-sex marriages (in 1989).

Maybe we just don’t get it because we are mired in antiquated behaviour and conservatism. Or maybe the idea was to play on national stereotypes and generate attention through controversy.

Thinking of cultural insensitivity in tourism advertising reminds me of the Broadcast Advertising Clearance Centre in UK banning the TV spots for Tourism Australia for featuring the word ‘bloody’ (a word so inoffensive in today’s society, that my grandmother would not be averse to using it).

It goes to show how even the smallest of issues can be misconstrued and misinterpreted, with the original objective and intention completely lost in the ensuing public debate.

My favourite campaign of 2009 – Choose a Different Ending

There has been loads of innovative work out there this year, but the campaign that impressed me most was ‘Choose a Different Ending‘. This was created for the Metropolitan Police (in conjunction with http://www.droptheweapons.org/) by AMV BBDO UK, and was directed by Nottingham-based short film-maker Simon Ellis. The objective was to raise awareness of knife-related crime in London.

The set-up is a series of short interactive YouTube videos where the viewer gets to choose what happens next by clicking on one of the options. So, in the first video, when the protagonist (the film is shot in the first-person) is about to head out with his mates, the first choice, as a hand hovers over a knife rack, is ‘Take the Knife’ or ‘Don’t Take the Knife’. As you choose your options you will very quickly be moved in to situations of varying severity, such as getting arrested for possession, or ending up looking at a life sentence for stabbing someone in the chest.

This is of course unless you reject repeated calls to grab a weapon, in which case you end up at a party dancing with the girl of your dreams. What I noticed is that each time I have gone through the options, this is the last path I took!

Alongside the YouTube channel there was also a TV component with the same different endings.

It was really the user interaction aspect that made this campaign stand out for me, rather than anything based around results. It builds on the well-established Public Service Announcement and brings it in to the modern age using social media in an original fashion.

Regarding results, the YouTube channel has had over 460,000 views which sounds a little underwhelming for something that was clearly designed to be a viral hit and beyond that it is quite hard to get any idea of how the campaign performed against expectations, etc. It would be interesting to find out as this is an excellent idea, executed to perfection and I would like to see this sort of work encouraged in the future.

The 30 Freakiest Ads of 2009

This is a most entertaining end of year list, to be found on the AdFreak blog, The 30 Freakiest ads of 2009.

If telekinetic children, talking pizzas, roller-skating babies, or polar bears falling from the sky is of interest, then this is the right place.

However, there is no way the Apoliva girl is as scary as that ‘scientist’ in the Ashley & Martin ad.

That said, a lot of these are genuinely distressing and focus on the likes of road safety, STDs and mental/ physical abuse. Thought-provoking, extreme, and creatively outstanding.

New Gut Foundation ad reminiscent of ‘scam’ WWF ad

A new campaign for the Gut Foundation uses the impact that a terrorist attack on Sydney would create to raise awareness of bowel cancer, Cancer ad features terror attack on Sydney.

Having watched the ad, I am reminded of an unathorised, ‘scam’ ad allegedly created by DDB Brazil for the WWF earlier in the year, which had a video version and a print version.

DDB Brazil denied creating this, and the WWF denied commissioning it in the ensuing controversy, which gives an insight as to what may unfold when the Gut Foundation’s ad launches.