Tag Archives: digital

What/ who is Bluebird and how do I stop it/ him/ her?

As I was rushing to work (running late) on Friday morning, I nearly got knocked over by a bunch of protesters blowing whistles and wearing white chemical protection suits as I entered Central Station. Putting aside my wave of commuter-rage (how dare people get in my way, I am trying to get to work, ferchrissakes!), I checked out one of their placards, and saw “Stop Bluebird”, then realised they had it on their T-shirts, and were shouting it too.

Always one to be a part of a “Stop …” anything kind of campaign, I did a Google web search at my earliest opportunity, and was directed to a site called “Dreams of Anthropocene” at http://www.lulurich.com.au/ (everything I saw pointed towards stopbluebird.com, a URL that doesn’t seem to exist, instead re-directing to this one).

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Google ads for Chrome extensions and Translate

I am a massive fan of Chrome, and have had it as my default browser for months at the expense of Firefox. Extensions have been available for a while and once downloaded the icons sit neatly alongside the address bar in the top right of the browser.

There are not as many available as in Firefox, as you might expect, but I already have Facebook, Delicious, Dropbox, Gmail, Digg, Evernote and Chromed Bird (an impressive Twitter extension).

Google has released a promo video for Extensions this week and it is equally impressive.

At the same time as this, a promo was released for Google Translate.  I have only started using this a lot recently since an old French friend got in touch via Twitter. In my limited experience it seems to be a great product, and again, the video is fantastic.

Carlton Draught’s new TVC campaign

Your Weenis, your Weenis, it's wrinkly and it's pink

Your Weenis, your Weenis, it's wrinkly and it's pink

Here is the latest campaign for Carlton Draught, the sixth in the ‘Made from Beer’ series.

It was due to launch on television in February but was pulled by Carlton & United Breweries at the last-minute due to concerns that it may offend viewers.

The full series of 7 short spots can be seen at http://anyexcuse.com.au/ and is worth checking out, especially for Tingle, Weenis, and Wart.

The ads are pretty funny, and continue the humourous themes seen earlier in the series. I do hope, however, that the late jitters isn’t indicative of an increasing trend of advertisers becoming frightened enough about offending people that they substantially alter their marketing campaigns.

Updated: This campaign has now been pulled from the internet as well due to fears over a ‘public backlash’.

Online Metrics: Trends for 2010 from Mediapost

Great post here from the Mediapost Online Metrics Insider blog. Written by Josh Chasin, who is the chief research officer at comScore, Inc. in the U.S. it looks forward to what might happen in 2010 around online measurement and how that might expand to include wider media channels.

Online Metrics: Trends for 2010

The articles touches on 3 subjects of great interest to me, as follows.

The symbiotic relationship between panel-based audience measurement and web analytics and how these two aspects will continue to overlap and benefit the overall objective of obtaining  accurate data.

Secondly, the benefits of using online as a brand-building tool. Whilst I am surprised that there is still skepticism around using online for the purposes of effective brand-building, I see this as an engaging challenge and one that will surely develop rapidly in 2010.

Thirdly, the importance of cross-platform measurements. How do we equate digital measurements to other metrics such as TARPs? Should digital be looking to move closer to these models in order to offer advertisers more value, or should other media be moving closer to digital? This side of things will only become more important as mobile take up continues to grow at such a huge rate.

A fascinating find in this article is the exercise conducted by the Washington Post in 2007 (Violinist Joshua Bell played incognito in a Washington Subway), which was “an experiment in context, perception and priorities”, according to writer Gene Weingarten. How important is contextual relevance? Do we only see something of worth if it is in the right setting?

Do you have time for beauty?

Youtube ad campaign for Danish Tourism board depicts single mum looking for her child’s father

I have only just discovered this extraordinary ad campaign on Boing Boing – there was some controversy surrounding this back in September resulting in the ad being removed from Youtube.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

more about “Youtube ad campaign for Danish Touris…“, posted with vodpod

What makes this campaign extraordinary is the fact that rather than promoting safe sex, or prevention of STDs or unwanted pregnancy, it is in fact for the Danish Tourist Board, and the objective is to encourage more overseas visitors to consider Denmark as a holiday destination.

The controversial aspects of the campaign are clear, and have been discussed elsewhere, particularly on Adland.tv.

What struck me was the comments made by the CEO of Danish Tourism, Dorte Kiilerich.

“Karen’s story shows that Denmark is a free place with space for you to be who you want. The film is good exposure for Danish self-sufficient and dignified women.”

I don’t really see this at all, and judging by the controversy and subsequent apology, it would seem that other people don’t either. I am just wondering if this is because we aren’t Danish. Denmark is a society that really is socially ahead of the curve, having been the first country to legalise pornography (in 1969) and same-sex marriages (in 1989).

Maybe we just don’t get it because we are mired in antiquated behaviour and conservatism. Or maybe the idea was to play on national stereotypes and generate attention through controversy.

Thinking of cultural insensitivity in tourism advertising reminds me of the Broadcast Advertising Clearance Centre in UK banning the TV spots for Tourism Australia for featuring the word ‘bloody’ (a word so inoffensive in today’s society, that my grandmother would not be averse to using it).

It goes to show how even the smallest of issues can be misconstrued and misinterpreted, with the original objective and intention completely lost in the ensuing public debate.